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Manuka honey inhibits the development of Streptococcus pyogenes biofilms and causes reduced expression of two fibronectin binding proteins.

Manuka honey inhibits the development of Streptococcus pyogenes biofilms and causes reduced expression of two fibronectin binding proteins.









No. Divisions/Titles for Abstract Details

1 Abstract Title Manuka honey inhibits the development of Streptococcus pyogenes biofilms and causes reduced expression of two fibronectin binding proteins.


2 Abstract Source Microbiology, 158, 781-790.

3 Abstract Author(s) Maddocks, S. E., Lopez, M. S., Rowlands, R. S. & Cooper, R. A.


4 Article Affiliation Cardiff Metropolitan University, Western Avenue, Cardiff CF5 2YB, UK.


5 Abstract Streptococcus pyogenes (a species of Gram-positive bacteria)(group A Streptococcus; GAS) is always of clinical significance in wounds where it can initiate infection, destroy skin grafts (a type of graft surgery involving the transplantation of skin)and persist as a biofilm (any group of microorganisms in which cells stick to each other and often also to a surface). Manuka honey has broad spectrum antimicrobial activity and its use in the clinical setting is beginning to gain acceptance with the continuing emergence of antibiotic resistance and the inadequacy of established systemic therapies; novel inhibitors may affect clinical practice. In this study, the effect of manuka honey on S. pyogenes (M28) was investigated in vitro with planktonic (These organisms include bacteria, archaea, algae, protozoa and drifting or floating animals that inhabit)and biofilm cultures using MIC (the lowest concentration of a chemical which prevents visible growth of a bacterium), MBC( is the lowest concentration of an antibacterial agent required to kill a particular bacterium.), microscopy and aggregation efficiency. Bactericidal (antibiotics kill bacteria)effects were found in both planktonic cultures and biofilms, although higher concentrations of manuka honey were needed to inhibit biofilms. Abrogation of adherence and intercellular aggregation was observed. Manuka honey permeated 24 h established biofilms of S. pyogenes, resulting in significant cell death and dissociation of cells from the biofilm. Sublethal concentrations of manuka honey effectively prevented the binding of S. pyogenes to the human tissue protein fibronectin (is a high-molecular weight (~440kDa) glycoprotein of the extracellular matrix that binds to membrane-spanning receptor proteins called integrins), but did not inhibit binding to fibrinogen. The observed inhibition of fibronectin binding was confirmed by a reduction in the expression of genes encoding two major fibronectin-binding streptococcal surface proteins, Sof and SfbI. These findings indicate that manuka honey has potential in the topical treatment of wounds containing S. pyogenes.


6 Summary The observed inhibition of fibronectin binding was confirmed by a reduction in the expression of genes encoding two major fibronectin-binding streptococcal surface proteins, Sof and SfbI. These findings indicate that manuka honey has potential in the topical treatment of wounds containing S. pyogenes.


7 Article Published Date March-2012.


8 Study Type Invitro.


9 Substances Manuka honey.


10 Diseases bacterial infection.


11 Pharmacological Actions anti-bacterial.


12 Link https://goo.gl/4yNJ2w








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