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Clorox

Clorox



Clorox


Question from Nasim Asharq : Does the Clorox interact with the dishes and kitchenware causing cancer?


The answer:


Clorox is used in household for disinfecting and for bleaching. The scientific composition of such liquids is known as–Sodium Hypochlorite (Greatorex et.al., 2010)  . which is an extreme oxidizing substance if not diluted and used in its concentrated form. It may cause skin burns and destroy the eye completely upon direct contact to skin and eyes.

(Jones et.al., 2010)

 

However, studies indicated that liquid chlorine must not be combined with any other household cleaners  that is because it may interact with them releasing the chlorine gas itself, which is a poisonous gas, particularly when interacting with the cleaners of acidic contents(Kim et.al., 2014) .In addition,  Household cleaners, which contain ammonia when mixed with the fluid chlorine, generate the chlorinated amino acids which is a toxic material also.

(Zock et.al., 2010) 

 

Studies showed that some substances resulting from mixing the cleaners with chlorine may be carcinogenic (McDonald et.al., 2005) . A study has reported that when mixing the chlorine with some detergents, chloroform concentration increases in the air of a house 8 to 52 times, and the concentration of the carbon tetrachloride in the same air increases 1 to 1170 times, imagine!

(Odabasi, 2008)

  

About using chlorine in washing kitchenware, although there is no studies that investigated interaction of chlorine with kitchenware yet It is from a theoretical side liable for interacting with some metals. Therefore I recommend avoiding chlorine-agents in cleaning the kitchenware until studies confirm that it is safe. In fact I do not encourage the use of chlorine products at all; instead I encourage using vinegar as a cleaner and a sterilizer with excellent and safe results at the same.


References:


Greatorex, J. S., Page, R. F., Curran, M. D., Digard, P., Enstone, J. E., Wreghitt, T., Powell, P. P., Sexton, D. W., Vivancos, R. & Nguyen-Van-Tam, J. S. 2010. Effectiveness of common household cleaning agents in reducing the viability of human influenza a/h1n1. PLOS ONE, 5, e8987.


Jones, R., Wills, B. & Kang, C. 2010. Chlorine gas: An evolving hazardous material threat and unconventional weapon. Western Journal of Emergency Medicine, 11.


Kim, J.-A., Yoon, S.-Y., Cho, S.-Y., Yu, J.-H., Kim, H.-S., Lim, G.-I. & Kim, J.-S. 2014. Acute health effects of accidental chlorine gas exposure. Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 26, 29.


Mcdonald, T. A. & Komulainen, H. 2005. Carcinogenicity of the chlorination disinfection by-product mx. J Environ Sci Health C Environ Carcinog Ecotoxicol Rev, 23, 163-214.


Odabasi, M. 2008. Halogenated volatile organic compounds from the use of chlorine-bleach-containing household products. Environ Sci Technol, 42, 1445-51.


Zock, J.-P., Vizcaya, D. & Le Moual, N. 2010. Update on asthma and cleaners. Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 10, 114-120.


Odabasi, M. 2008. Halogenated volatile organic compounds from the use of chlorine-bleach-containing household products. Environ Sci Technol, 42, 1445-51.

Zock, J.-P., Vizcaya, D. & Le Moual, N. 2010. Update on asthma and cleaners. Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 10, 114-120.



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